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Fiction

Return from Oz



Fiction

She went there once, when she was a younger woman, a girl really. It shined green, but more like a reflection of the ocean, like the Puget Sound and its seaweed coloring, than any precious stone.
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The Squeeze



Fiction

I guess you could say—my mother. My mother was a squeezer. It wouldn’t surprise me if someone’s mother whom you know is also a squeezer. Perhaps even your own mother. I’m told it’s pretty common.
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As Fire Bites



Fiction

I own an apartment in the West Village, a house in the Hamptons, a cabin in Vail. In short, save an unlikely revolution, the chances of me actually using one of those spaces—the doorway of St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, or a bridge overpass—are virtually non-existent.
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Minor Inconveniences



Fiction

Landau stands before the blossoming fresco. Castles and horses and knights, but none of the fairytale silliness that could so easily prove ruinous. Fierce animals rendered in wistful but determined brushstrokes.
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Into the Future



Fiction

Yungman had pondered on this strange turn of fate. How he had always wanted to work with the prestigious Doctors Without Borders and now he would not only be doing that, but they would be taking him home.
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Columns

No Way Out: Jason Starr’s “Fake I.D.”



Columns

By now, fans of Hard Case Crime’s brand of pulp crime fiction already know Jason Starr.  Along with the delightfully cynical crime writer Ken Bruen of Ireland, Starr co-authored Bust, Slide, and The Max—a wicked trilogy reveling in dark humor, gratuitous sex & violence, and…
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Christa Faust’s Money Shot Cashes In



Columns

Hard Case Crime recently turned 50. The independent publishing house dedicated to all things pulp has published over 50 titles since it opened for business in 2005. And what a business for lovers of crime fiction: HCC not only reissues out of print classics by…
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Doing It Right: Interview with Gregg Hurwitz



Columns

Los Angeles. The city of (fallen) angels has lured many crime fiction writers over the years, its truths often stranger than fiction. From Hollywood to Echo Park, L.A. is a siren song of corruption, racial tension, drugs, and silicone implants. Perfect grist for a writer’s…
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Easyreeder



Columns

WEEK 1 UNRELIABLE NARRATOR Do you want a reliable narrator?  An unreliable narrator?  If there is any first-person element to your narration, there’s one answer: all people lie to themselves, all people are unreliable.  The question is of degree.  While extremely unreliable narrators are fascinating…
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[CRIME CORNER] Lawrence Block: Romance of the Ordinary Life



Columns

Lawrence Block, Hit and Run 304 pages, $24.95 Published by William Morrow Keller is back. This spring, Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Lawrence Block rolled out the latest exploits of Keller, full-time assassin and amateur philatelist.  Block’s newest novel in 3 years, Hit and…
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Interviews

Body Thesaurus: Jennifer Militello Interview



Interviews

Jennifer Militello is the author of three collections of poetry: Body Thesaurus (Tupelo Press, 2013), Flinch of Song (Tupelo Press, 2009), winner of the Tupelo Press First Book Award, and the chapbook Anchor Chain, Open Sail. Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, The…
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Strange Life:  Eleanor Lerman Interview



Interviews

In the literary universe, I find that poets are usually the most humble of writers, with subtle, dry wits, an admirable penchant for solitude, and a dogged dedication to their craft.  They are the long distance walkers of track, often plying their trade in relative…
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The Number of Missing: Adam Berlin Interview



Interviews

Adam Berlin is the literary equivalent of the boxer who relishes the craft, the pugilist who respects the “sweet science” to such a degree that he willingly pays his dues, is patient to wait his turn and hone his skills, until the moment comes when…
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KGB Interview: Thaddeus Rutkowski



Interviews

If James Brown was the “Hardest Working Man in Show Business,” author Thaddeus Rutkowski (on left), whose latest book Haywire reached No. 1 on Small Press Distribution’s fiction best-seller list, is the living version in literature. A writer’s writer, who has built up a considerable…
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Telling Tales - One Writer + One Focus = One Story



Interviews

An occasional look into pivotal moments in writers’ lives. “The spaces I have been privy to are phenomenally unusual.” Based upon my conversation with poet Nomi Stone, I agree with her assessment of her experiences. Stranger’s Notebook (Triquarterly, 2008), her first book of poetry, chronicles…
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Book Reviews

CAN’T AND WON’T by Lydia Davis



Book Reviews

It takes a genius to title a book something as emphatically negative as Can’t and Won’t (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Short story maestro Lydia Davis won the coveted MacArthur Foundation award a decade ago, and this new collection of some 200 pieces will thrill loyal…
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SHORT CENTURY by David Burr Gerrard



Book Reviews

Is the personal political? David Burr Gerrard’s debut novel Short Century (Barnacle Books/Rare Bird) answers that question strongly in the affirmative, at least in the life of journalist Arthur Hunt. A privileged WASP whose sixties radicalism calcified into strident neocon-ism by the time of the…
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KARATE CHOP by Dorthe Nors. Translated by Martin Aitken



Book Reviews

Years ago, fresh cut from one of those breakups that forces you to alter your daily life on the most minute levels, I was attending the wedding of a family member marrying her first love after a few months’ courtship. The ceremony was predictably traditional,…
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THE JESUS LIZARD BOOK



Book Reviews

It is fitting in a number of ways that The Jesus Lizard Book (Akashic Books) now exists. Given their sense of humor, in a way it seems only natural that the Jesus Lizard, the most concomitantly precise and chaotic, aggressive and artistic rock band of…
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NICETIES: Aural Ardor, Pardon Me by Elizabeth Mikesch



Book Reviews

If we start from Randall Jarrell’s definition of a novel as “a prose narrative of some length that has something wrong with it,” Elizabeth Mikesch’s new book, Niceties: Aural Ardor, Pardon Me (Calamari Press) is a collection of short stories, insomuch as it is a…
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